Showing 1-10 of 67 items.

Cron Job at Every 5 Minutes in Linux

Last updated on Jan 2, 2020 in Linux

To schedule a task to be run in every 5 minutes, you can set up a cron job in Linux.

Cron Job at Every 15 Minutes in Linux

Last updated on Jan 2, 2020 in Linux

Set up a cron job in Linux to call script at every 15 minute.

Cron Job at Every Minute in Linux

Last updated on Jan 2, 2020 in Linux

In Linux, you can schedule any script to be called in regular interval. This tutorial is about to set up script to be run in every minute.

Cron Job at Specific Time in Linux

Last updated on Jan 2, 2020 in Linux

To schedule a task to be run in a specific time in Linux can be done with cron jobs. For example, you might want to run backup process at midnight or at 3:00 AM.

Crontab Format in Linux

Last updated on Jan 2, 2020 in Linux

With crontab you can schedule tasks to be run in regular intervals. To do this, you need to know the crontab format. This tutorial describes briefly about the format of a crontab.

Disable Cron Job Output and Log

Last updated on Jan 2, 2020 in Linux

When the cron job runs, it outputs the result to the standard output (STDOUT) or standard error (STDERR). Especially, if you execute `wget` command, it creates a new file at every time. This tutorial is about how to disable the output.

Wget in Crontab: Disable Saving File

Last updated on Jan 2, 2020 in Linux

When the cron job executes `wget` command (fetches URL resource), it creates a new file every time. It doesn't overwrite the old downloaded file, but appends a number so by time, there will be thousands of files unless you tweak your crontab to suppress the output.

Cron Job Save Output to a Log File

Last updated on Jan 2, 2020 in Linux

When the cron job runs, it outputs the script's result to the standard output (STDOUT) or standard error (STDERR). If you want to save both the output and errors to a log file, this tutorial tells how to do it.

Linux Check Free Disk Space

Last updated on Jan 2, 2020 in Linux

To check free disk space in Linux file system, you can use `df` command which stands for "Disk Free".

Get Current Directory in Linux

Last updated on Jan 3, 2020 in Linux

When working in command line in Linux, it is not always clear what is the current working directory or path. Or, in case of home folder `~`, you sometimes need to know the real path.